One of “Those” Moves

Sometimes I see a position and I think that if only I could understand some aspect of it that I would be closer to understanding chess on a much deeper level.

Take this position for instance. The game is Radjabov-Mamedov from Shamkir 2018

Here White has just played 15.Ng5 which seems tantamount to offering a draw. So mentally I’m thinking “OK, 15…Bxg5 16.Qxg5 Qxg5 17.Bxg5.” However, after 15…Bxg5 16.Qxg5 Mamedov plays 16…Bg6

OK, now this I can puzzle through and understand. If Black would have continued through with my idea then he would have been developing White’s dark squared bishop for free.

So after 17.Qxd8 Rxd8 18.Be2 Nb8 19.Be3 Nc6 20.Rfc1 this position is reached:

Here Mamedov plays 20…Rdc8.

This is one of those “which rook” positions that drive me nuts. My first thought is that maybe there’s a problem with 20…Rac8 21.Bg5 Rd7 22.b4, but as I looked at the position I realized there was an immediate tactical refutation after 21.Bg5

Here Black would simply play 21…Nxd4 as the rook on d8 is impervious to capture due to the fork threat on e2.

So this leaves me wondering…what is the real difference. Clearly there is one, but what?

Food for thought and something to work on.

Here is the entire game:

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

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Nice Attacking Game by MVL

One of the nice things about the way that the Gibraltar tournament has morphed into an event where numerous top flight players compete is that it gives us chess fans chances to see what they can really do.

You can go through every game from an event like the Sinquefield Cup, and if you’re really lucky you get one game that features a brilliant attack.

Yet at an event like Gibraltar, where it’s common to see 2770’s facing 2300-2400’s in the early rounds we get a chance to really see them shine.

Take a look at this game from round one, where MVL easily blows former Webster student Irine Sukandar off the board with a sparkling attack against her Accelerated Dragon.

These games are real treats.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

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Artemiev Showing he Belongs

On day two of the Tata Steel Masters group in Wijk an Zee. Vladislav Artemiev showed that not only does he belong in the top group, but that he can contend as well.

On the White side of the English the young Russian ground down his more experience countryman Nikita Vitiugov.

Here is a position that shows some things I’m really trying to refine in my own games:

How often would a club player either trade or not trade queens almost automatically as a matter of personal preference? Well here Artemiev trades queens, but for a specific reason.

After 16.Qxd8+ Rxd8 17.Be3 0-0 18.Bb6 it becomes clear that White will now control the d file as Black has difficulty challenging that control since White controls the d8 square.

At the same time, should Black recapture the queen with a move such as 16…Bxd8 then after 17.Bf4 White has a much better position:

Here is the entire game:

All in all a good performance by Artemiev and proof that he’s a got a bright future.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

If you like this blog, please consider becoming a Patreon supporter. Any money I raise will go towards lessons and stronger tournaments.

If you can spare it, please click here and become a supporter. Even $1 a month can help me achieve my dream.

%MCEPASTEBIN%

Ganguly – Warmerdam 1-0

Yesterday, in round one of the Tata Steel Challengers Group Indian GM Surya Ganguly faced local IM Max Warmerdam.

While I’ve known who Ganguly is for some time I’ve only recently taken a real interest in his games as I’ve been reading The Anand Files.

Ganguly is a long time second for Vishy, having worked with him during several world championship matches.

Here he wins a nice game on the White side of the English Attack against Warmerdam’s Najdorf.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

If you like this blog, please consider becoming a Patreon supporter. Any money I raise will go towards lessons and stronger tournaments.

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The Last Battle of Boris Spassky

In 2009 two elder statesmen met in Elista to rekindle their rivalry when Boris Spassky face Viktor Korchnoi in an eight game match.

Boris had arrived several days in advance, while Viktor rushed to arrive from London where he had just been guest of honor at the London Chess Classic.

As the 78 year old Korchnoi was exhausted after his last minute arrival, Spassky proposed limiting the match to six games instead of the scheduled eight and giving Korchnoi an additional rest day.

Viktor refused and managed to take the first game from the 72 year old Spassky, who had played his last serious game seven years prior.

Nevertheless, Spassky fought back and the match ended in a draw. These are to date (and presumably for all time to come) the final professional games of Spassky to appear in the database.

And so Boris the Tenth rode off into the sunset…

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

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Relentless Technique by Hikaru

In the recently concluded World Rapid and Blitz Championships Super GM Hikaru Nakamura represented his home country of the USA quite nicely taking home the bronze (on tiebreaks as he finished in a tie for second) in the Rapid and the silver (on tiebreaks as he finished in a tie for first) in the Blitz.

In this game against Russian GM Alexander Riazantsev he shows relentess technique in grinding his opponent down.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

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Marshall Marshall Marshall

Yeah, OK…most of those reading this won’t get the Brady Bunch reference. I get it. But I do them for me, not you! 🙂

Here is an example of a game in the Marshall Attack in the Spanish that perfectly illustrates how to handle these positions.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

If you like this blog, please consider becoming a Patreon supporter. Any money I raise will go towards lessons and stronger tournaments.

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Steinitz – von Bardeleben 1-0

Yesterday I was speaking with a friend of mine about this game. This is one that EVERYONE should be aware of. It’s that good.

Here’s YouTube sensation Agadmator commenting on the game, even though he inadvertently says “1985” instead of 1895 for the year.

I hope you enjoy this game as much as I do.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

If you like this blog, please consider becoming a Patreon supporter. Any money I raise will go towards lessons and stronger tournaments.

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Guess The Move Filip-Korchnoi 0-1

You may have picked up on a theme recently, which is that I have been working on some Guess the Move games with a friend of mine.

This past Thursday at the chess club my game ended in a quick draw so once again we worked on some Guess the Move..

The intention here was to look at a game more strategic and positional in nature than the tactical maelstrom we reviewed in the Hort -Ribli game.

That gave us this:

So here you go…paste this into Chessbase and put it on training mode and have fun!

[Event “Siegen ol (Men) fin-A”]
[Site “Siegen”]
[Date “1970.09.17”]
[Round “4”]
[White “Filip, Miroslav”]
[Black “Kortschnoj, Viktor”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “E19”]
[WhiteElo “2510”]
[BlackElo “2640”]
[PlyCount “74”]
[EventDate “1970.09.05”]
[EventType “team”]
[EventRounds “11”]
[EventCountry “GER”]
[SourceTitle “OM OTB 201804”]
[Source “Opening Master”]
[SourceDate “2018.04.24”]
[SourceVersion “2”]
[SourceVersionDate “2018.04.24”]
[SourceQuality “1”]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Nc3 Ne4 8. Qc2
Nxc3 9. Qxc3 c5 10. Rd1 d6 11. b3 Bf6 12. Bb2 Qe7 13. Qd2 Rd8 14. Ne1 Bxg2 15.
Nxg2 Nc6 16. d5 exd5 17. cxd5 Bxb2 18. Qxb2 Nd4 19. e3 Nf3+ 20. Kh1 Qe4 21. Qe2
a6 22. Qd3 Qg4 23. Ne1 Re8 24. Nxf3 Qxf3+ 25. Kg1 Re5 26. a4 h5 27. Ra2 g5 28.
Qe2 g4 29. Qxf3 gxf3 30. Rc2 Re4 31. Rc4 f5 32. h3 Kf7 33. Kh2 b5 34. Rxe4 fxe4
35. Ra1 b4 36. g4 h4 37. g5 Rc8 0-1

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

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What a Game! Nakamura – Andreikin 1-0

One of my students has this problem with passivity. He often gets his pieces out quickly in the opening, but then founders a bit and simply hands the initiative over to his opponent.

After seeing and hearing of many good positions being spoiled this way I started showing him some King’s Gambit games. Not because I think he should play the opening, but because I think that so many of those games are famous for teaching about the importance of speed and initiative.

Of course we looked at games like the immortal game:

And more modern games like Nakamura – Adams:

So tonight I was thinking…I wonder f there are any other games Hikaru has played in the KG that would be worth showing my student. I messaged Hikaru to ask him if he had any good ones and he said “My game against Andreikin in the World Blitz.”

And that’s where I discovered this amazing game. Enjoy!

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

If you like this blog, please consider becoming a Patreon supporter. Any money I raise will go towards lessons and stronger tournaments.

If you can spare it, please click here and become a supporter. Even $1 a month can help me achieve my dream.