Alekhine in San Remo 1930 – Round Four

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Today we look at the round four game in San Remo between Vidmar and Alekhine. After winning this game, the world champion was off to a 4-0 start.

This is a game that should be required learning material for an serious student who is just starting out.

Alekhine has a nice middlegame position, which he exchanges for an endgame with an outside passed pawn, eventually trading that down into a rook and two vs knight and three ending with all the pawns on the same side of the board.

From here the good doctors technique is quite educational.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

Alekhine in San Remo 1930 – Round Three

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In round three, the world champion continues with another impressive win, this time against Nimzowitsch.

This game features the “Alekhine’s Gun” by it’s namesake. The annotations are in German, but should be followable.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

Alekhine in San Remo 1930 – Round Two

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In round two, Dr. Alekhine once again brings home the full point. This time he gets pawns rolling down the kingside and in the center to drive his opponent back and then wins a pawn.

Eventually he exchanges down into a rook ending where he shows impeccable technique.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

Alekhine in San Remo 1930 – Round One

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Recently we took a look at Karpov’s Linares 1994 performance. Today we begin with one that is in the same realm of all time great performances.

After winning the world championship from Capablanca in 1927, Alexander Alekhine spend a couple of years touring and giving simuls.

Finally, in January of 1930 he was ready to once again play in a top level event. Over 15 rounds he surrendered only two draws.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

Karpov in Linares 1994 – Round Thirteen

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And so we reach the final round. The tournament has been clinched and there is nothing left to prove. Many would simply play a quick draw here and go home to count their money and rating gains.

However, that was not be be. After his opponent, Beliavsky, made a couple of poor moves in the opening, Karpov was able to quickly and easily convert to make it 11/13 for the event.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

Karpov in Linares 1994 – Round Twelve

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The penultimate round sees Karpov held to a draw for the fourth and final time. This gives him a score of 10/12 heading into the final round.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott

Karpov in Linares 1994 – Round Eleven

My Patreon page is now live! I could really use your help. If you’ve seen this more than once that means that you’re hopefully getting something useful out of this blog. I pay all of the costs for hosting, and put a lot of effort into creating the content. Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter.  If you can spare it, please click here and become a supporter. Even $1 a month can help me continue this project. When a player starts with 8.5 out of the first ten rounds, it would make sense for that player to steer games into quiet paths for the final three rounds of the event in order to seal the victory in as riskless a way as possible. 27 years ago, in the sleepy Spanish town of Linares, the chess world was shown a different side of the game when former world champion Anatoly Karpov showed he had no intentions of slowing down in his round eleven game against future world champion Vladimir Kramnik. Here is that game, which features a sharp opening followed by the relentless technique that Karpov is known for.

Til Next Time, Chris Wainscott

Karpov in Linares 1994 – Round Ten

My Patreon page is now live! I could really use your help. If you’ve seen this more than once that means that you’re hopefully getting something useful out of this blog. I pay all of the costs for hosting, and put a lot of effort into creating the content. Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter.  If you can spare it, please click here and become a supporter. Even $1 a month can help me continue this project. Round Ten sees Karpov once again held to a draw. This time by the young phenom he will play for the FIDE World Championship in two years’ time, Gata Kamsky.

Til Next Time, Chris Wainscott

Karpov in Linares 1994 – Round Nine

My Patreon page is now live! I could really use your help. If you’ve seen this more than once that means that you’re hopefully getting something useful out of this blog. I pay all of the costs for hosting, and put a lot of effort into creating the content. Please consider becoming a Patreon supporter.  If you can spare it, please click here and become a supporter. Even $1 a month can help me continue this project. Round nine sees the matchup between Karpov and Shirov. While the game ends in a draw, it’s an interesting and hard fought draw. This game serves as a reminder to those who complain about draws that many draws are fighting affairs.

With this effort, Karpov is off to a 8-1 start! Til Next Time, Chris Wainscott

Karpov in Linares 1994 – Round Eight

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After finally being held to a draw by Kasparov in round seven, Karpov gets back to his winning ways in round eight, this time against The Boy From Minsk, Boris Gelfand.

After this victory, Karpov stands alone at the top with a score of 7.5 out of 8.

Til Next Time,

Chris Wainscott